Skip Navigation

Manuela Morales: Una Memoria Desconectada (A Disconnected Memory)

March 4 – April 5, 2015
Student Gallery, Ryerson Image Centre

In 1973, a military coup d’état occurred in Chile, launching a seventeen-year dictatorship and ending democratic political progression. The artist’s father, Francisco Morales, was a member of a left-wing party and was arrested, tortured and exiled for his actions. Although estranged from her father for many years, the artist recently travelled to Chile to visit him and create this project. The exhibition intertwines personal narrative with an account of the political events that drastically altered Chile’s cultural landscape.

Fig. 1

Manuela Morales, Flag, 2014. Digital scan, 35 mm slide. Courtesy of the artist

Fig. 2

Manuela Morales, Books of Allende, 2014. Digital scan, 35 mm slide. Courtesy of the artist

Fig. 3

Manuela Morales, Cecilia, 2014. Digital scan, 35 mm slide. Courtesy of the artist

Fig. 4

Manuela Morales, Guard, 2014. Digital scan, 35 mm slide. Courtesy of the artist

Fig. 5

Manuela Morales, Outside, 2014. Digital scan, 35 mm slide. Courtesy of the artist

Installation Shots

2 video stills in a dark room. On-screen text reads "I stayed for 2 weeks. This is the longest amount of time my dad and I have spent alone since I was 5"
Fig. 1

Manuela Morales: Una Memoria Desconectada (A Disconnected Memory) (installation view), 2015 © Eugen Sakhnenko, Ryerson Image Centre

Video still in a dark room. On-screen text reads "This event in history distresses me because of what it did to a country I love and call my own, but also what it did to you and your as my father"
Fig. 2

Manuela Morales: Una Memoria Desconectada (A Disconnected Memory) (installation view), 2015 © Eugen Sakhnenko, Ryerson Image Centre

Two video stills in a dark room. On-screen text reads "The bombing of La Moneda"
Fig. 3

Manuela Morales: Una Memoria Desconectada (A Disconnected Memory) (installation view), 2015 © Eugen Sakhnenko, Ryerson Image Centre